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January Reading Recap

At the beginning of the month, I set my 2017 reading goal as reading one nonfiction and one fiction book each month. Since this turned out not to be very challenging, I decided to add two more goals – reading one book that was written before I was born (BIWB) and one book of a different genre or form each month. This month I selected The Plague by Albert Camus as the BIWB book, and a book of poetry – Notes on the Assemblage by U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera for the “other form” category.

Here’s what I read this month:

  • Nonfiction –
    •  The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee (Scribner, 2016)
    • Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach (2011)
    • Zika: The Emerging Epidemic by Donald G. McNeil Jr. (2016)
  • Fiction –
    • The Children’s Home by Charles Lambert (2016)
  • BIWB –
    • The Plague by Albert Camus (1947)
  • Other form / other genre
    • Notes on the Assemblage by Juan Felipe Herrera (2016)

Favorite book:  The Plague by Camus. It reminded me of why I loved literature as a teenager and young adult, and why, when I give myself the chance, I still do. Perhaps fortuitously, Camus’s book is mentioned in The Gene. This excerpt captures what I liked about both books quite well:

We need a manifesto – or at least a hitchhiker’s guide – for the post-genomic world. Historian Tony Judt once told me that Albert Camus’s novel The Plague was about the plague in the same sense as King Lear is about a king named Lear. In The Plague, a biological cataclysm becomes the testing ground for our fallibilities, desires and ambitions. You cannot read The Plague except as a thinly disguised allegory of human nature. The genome is also the testing ground of our fallibilities and desires, although reading it does not require understanding allegories and metaphors. What we read and write into our genome is our fallibilities, desires, and ambitions. It is human nature. — Siddhartha Mukherjee, The Gene: An Intimate History

 

 

 

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